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Author Topic: Italian Tactics  (Read 1283 times)

Offline Mugsy

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Re: Italian Tactics
« Reply #15 on: March 01, 2017, 09:41:31 PM »
Good solidarity with fellow whistlers there Renegade! But there was no excuse for that touch judge on that occasion; it was a simple decision to make and had nowt to do with the tackle law!
I'd say I was disappointed with the team in the studio who missed it too, but I'm well used to that lot misinterpreting passages of play or ref decisions. They often don't listen properly to what the ref is saying to the players and come up with a rubbish explanation for why the whistle was blown.
Can I tell you one thing which really annoys me about refereeing at the top levels; see if you agree?
The knock on/forward pass.
Forward passes are routinely ignored. I'm not talking about marginal flat balls, but blatant, obvious forward passes. Touch judges running exactly in line and perfectly positioned do nothing. Why?
Yet if a player drops the ball, whether it goes forward, back, to the side or whatever, it is judged an automatic knock-on - particularly when attempting to field a kick.

Offline stuartdm

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Re: Italian Tactics
« Reply #16 on: March 01, 2017, 10:45:28 PM »
Forward passes can be difficult with the new interpretation that it is the direction it leaves the hands and not the direction of flight.  There was an IRB video showing how the ball could travel 5m forward and still be a legal pass.

Offline Mugsy

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Re: Italian Tactics
« Reply #17 on: March 01, 2017, 11:34:56 PM »
Yeah I'm fully aware of that and agree with the principle behind it. But I'm not talking about such marginal calls. In every prem game you see deliberate and obvious forward passes - sometimes in the form of pops to short runners in midfield or a scrum half on a sideways run reversing a pass back in to a runner behind him (often this is impossible to execute without passing it forward.)
In wider play it is usually because a runner has failed to hold their depth and is far too flat to receive the pass, but gets it anyway. I feel it is another thing that has crept into our game from League - it's wrong and shouldn't be tolerated.
Even the commentators are forever saying: ''that looked very forward but play goes on''.

Offline R-dog

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Re: Italian Tactics
« Reply #18 on: March 02, 2017, 10:07:27 AM »
I totally agree. There does seem to be a lot of passes that are blatantly forward!! usually from the 9 or 10. I don't understand how they ignore so many of these yet even if ball goes backwards and you can clearly see it did. It is 9 times out of 10 deemed a knock on!

Another point I don't get that has been going on for years can any refs on this forum explain to me why at professional level they can feed the ball straight to the second row every scrum so it's not really a fair contest? Yet at our level refs are so strict about feeding I've played 9 and some ref's are so strict about it especially if the opposing team complains normally the next scrum you will get pinged even if your put in has been deemed fine up until then. Generally most teams put the ball in the middle (ish) at amateur level.